U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) prepares for Hurricane Harvey.  USACE assets have been prepositioned to provide a swift and effective response to the impending hurricane.
Liaison Officers, team leaders, and a Prime Power Planning and a Response Team from the 249th Engineer Battalion have deployed in support of state Emergency Operations Centers and FEMA Response Nodes. 
Additionally, local USACE Districts are conducting flood-fighting activities such as stockpiling and issuing flood-fighting materials (sandbags and materials/fabrics that keep soil in place) to local government entities in an effort to mitigate the effects of flooding in the area.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Hurricane Harvey Response Page
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is leaning forward in partnership with local, state, and federal response in the support of the people affected by the impacts from Hurricane Harvey. We currently have more than 353 personnel engaged and operating in coordination with county, ...
Aaron Byrd, civil research engineer in ERDC’s Coastal Hydraulics Laboratory, works on inundation maps for the Houston area during Hurricane Harvey August 29.
Corps of Engineers researchers use supercomputer to model Harvey flooding
As forecasts tracked Hurricane Harvey’s course toward Houston last week, researchers in Vicksburg, Mississippi were already calculating the flooding impacts from the storm to better inform the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer’s Emergency Operations team..
Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other weather related hazard.  Many of these deaths are related to vehicles driving through floodwaters or people walking closely to or in the actual flood.  People underestimate the force and power of water. 

According to the National Weather Service (NWS), flash floods are the most dangerous kind of floods as they combine the destructive power of a flood with incredible speed and unpredictability. Flash flooding by definition is “rapidly rising and MOVING water”. The force of moving water frequently damages roadbeds, sometimes to the point of collapse.  So many unnecessary vehicular flood related deaths occur as a result of motorists driving across flooded roads.
FloodAware Ohio by Ohio Silver Jackets
Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than from any other weather related hazard. Many of these deaths are related to vehicles driving through floodwaters or people walking closely to or in the actual flood. People underestimate the force and power of water. According to the National Weather Service (NWS), flash floods are the most dangerous kind of floods as they combine the destructive power of a flood with incredible speed and unpredictability. Flash flooding by definition is “rapidly rising and MOVING water”. The force of moving water frequently damages roadbeds, sometimes to the point of collapse. So many unnecessary vehicular flood related deaths occur as a result of motorists driving across flooded roads.

Regulatory Public Notices

LRH 2017-145-LMR

9/15/2017
The applicant has requested authorization for the proposed discharge of dredged and/or fill material into waters of the United States in association with the Kensington Residential Development project.

LRH 2016-00309-OHR

9/15/2017
West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection - West Virginia In-Lieu Fee Stream and Wetland Program

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