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The third Ordnance and Explosives Five-Year Review is underway for the Dolly Sods Region of the WVMA.  A Public Notice was placed within the local WV newspapers of Elkins, Petersburg, Parsons, and Franklin announcing the start of the third Five-Year Review process.

 

Dolly Sods Region Former West Virginia Maneuver Area  Public Notice—Third Five-Year Review

The third Ordnance and Explosives Five-Year Review is underway for the Dolly Sods Region of the Former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA) Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) Project. The purpose of the Five-Year Review process is to ensure the 1997-1998 ordnance re-moval remedy remains protective. As part of the review process, a non-intrusive site inspection of the Dolly Sods trails is scheduled for May 10, 2015 - May 16, 2015 by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers The site in-spection will include observations for the following: areas of erosion, flooding, sedimentation, social trails/campsites created by the public, and missing trail markers/UXO warning signs. Upon completion of the Five- Year Review, a report of the findings will be prepared for public review.

 

 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) solicits input from the community on the conclusions and recommendations resulting from the Second Ordnance and Explosives Five Year Recurring Review that was conducted on the Dolly Sods Region of the Former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA) Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) Project. The report's purpose is to ensure that an implemented 1997-98 ordnance removal action in the Dolly Sods Region continues to minimize explosives safety risks, and continues to be protective of human health, safety and the environment.

The USACE has set a public comment period for the draft final five-year review report from September 1 to September 30, 2011 to encourage public participation in the process. An electronic copy of the report is available here. The report is also available to the public at these following locations:

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Attn: Wyatt Kmen (CELRH-EC-CE)
502 Eighth Street
Huntington, WV 25701

Monongahela National Forest
Potomac Ranger District
HC59, Box 240
Petersburg, WV 26847
(1.5mi S of Petersburg on Rte 28/55)

Monongahela National Forest Headquarters
200 Sycamore Street
Elkins, WV 26241

Public review comments will be summarized and responses provided in the responsiveness summary section of the final five-year review report. To send written comments or obtain further information, please contact the following:

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Attn: Rick Meadows (CELRH-PM-P)
502 Eighth Street
Huntington, WV 25701

Dolly Sods FUDS Project on Display at National and Regional Events

The Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was invited to present a poster at this year's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Community Involvement Conference. The poster represents the efforts the USACE, and other project team members, have made in increasing public knowledge of the unexploded ordnance (UXO) issue at the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area of the Monongahela National Forest. The poster shows the different avenues for which the project team goes about increasing community awareness and increasing public education on the topic. Some of the ways the team increases public awareness are depicted in the poster. They include placing warning signs at Dolly Sods trailheads, the development of the Wally the Woodchuck project mascot, presentations at local festivals and fairs, developing the project's website, presentations to schools, public meetings and fire departments, and the production and dissemination of Dolly Sods Maps which help keep visitors to the area on UXO cleared trails. The conference was held in mid-August in Seattle, WA.

For the fourth year in a row, the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will host a booth at the Mountain State Forest Festival in Elkins, WV. The dates for the booth at this year's Forest Festival are October 1-3, 2009 in the Elkins City Park. The booth will showcase the USACE's West Virginia Maneuver Area/Dolly Sods FUDS Project and provide USACE officials with an opportunity to interact with the public and educate them on the unexploded ordnance (UXO) issue in Dolly Sods. Hope to see you at this year's booth!

 

5-Year Recurring Review Activities at Dolly Sods

The Dolly Sods Region of the former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA) is widely renowned as an outdoor paradise. The Army utilized this area, part of the larger WVMA, in 1943- 44 as an artillery and mortar practice firing range. Although the Army conducted decontamination efforts for unexploded ordnance (UXO) in the years following the region's use as an impact area, UXO was still being discovered in the decades following the Army's use. In 1997-98, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a UXO removal project to remove ordnance that was still present along trails and campsites located in the Dolly Sods Region. The purpose of the 1997-98 removal project was to minimize explosives risks and provide increased protection to human health and the environment. The removal project included clearing 55.79 miles of trails (the trail itself and 20 feet off center line to each side of the trail) and 178 campsites in the Dolly Sods Region.

Over the past year the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been conducting the second five-year Ordnance and Explosives (OE) Recurring Review study on the Dolly Sods Region. This study is to determine the effectiveness of an implemented ordnance removal project that occurred during 1997-98 and determine the effectiveness of the original five -year recurring review's recommendations. The original fiveyear recurring review on the Dolly Sods removal project was conducted by the Huntington District in 2003-04. The recommendation highlights of the first five year recurring review were the development of a project website development of a project public awareness and education campaign development of Dolly Sods hiking maps, and development of a project GIS database. These items have been very successful in increasing the public's knowledge of the UXO hazards at Dolly Sods, without causing alarm.

As noted above, this year's five-year recurring review will examine the recommendations of the first five-year recurring review, as well as, whether the initial removal action is still protective of human health and the environment. The draft version of the report will be completed in September 2009. Following review by different entities, the document will be available for public review. It is expected that the document will be available for public review in approximately November or December 2009. Prior to the public review period, a public meeting will be held to present the recommendations of the report and officially kick off the public review period.

 

Dolly Sods GIS Database Update

As part of this year's ongoing effort to conduct the second Five-Year Recurring Review on the Dolly Sods Region of the former WVMA, the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has contracted West Virginia University's Water Research Institute to update the USACE's Dolly Sods FUDS Project GIS database. The original GIS database for the WVMA/Dolly Sods FUDS Project was developed during the original Five-Year Recurring Review in 2003-04. The updated GIS database will add historical project mapping, updated trail routes and campground locations, historical areas of interest, and recent unexploded ordnance (UXO) discoveries to the existing project database. The updated database will allow the USACE to produce new trail maps for the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area, which will include updated trail locations and updated Wilderness Area boundaries. The database allows the USACE to manage the Dolly Sods Project for such things as UXO encounters, un-cleared campsite usage, trail locations and other pertinent project information.

WVMA Team Gives Presentation at Elkins, WV Event

This year (2008) the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Huntington District presented a booth at the Mountain State Forest Festival, in Elkins, WV, and gave a presentation to students at Davis and Elkins (D&E) College in Elkins. The booth at the Forest Festival and presentation to D&E students allowed FUDS Team Members the opportunity to speak with local citizens about the past usage of the West Virginia Maneuver Area and extending the message of following safety procedures while visiting the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area. Promotional items prominently featuring the Dolly Sods safety message were passed out to attendees. The promotional items featured the Monongahela National Forest's UXO (Unexploded Ordnance) Hotline Phone Number for use in the event that they had a UXO find while utilizing the Dolly Sods Area. Overall the presentations were deemed a success, since the Dolly Sods safety message was presented to a large number of people, and potential users of the Dolly Sods Area were made aware of the potential dangers at the site.

 

WVMA Team Prepares for Second Five-Year Recurring

Starting in October 2008, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Huntington District will begin preparing the second Five-Year Ordnance and Explosives Recurring Review Report for the West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA)/ Dolly Sods FUDS Project. The initial Recurring Review was conducted by the Huntington District in 2004 and noted the need for increased public awareness, continued updating of the newly developed project-related GIS database, map development and distribution, and improvements to warning sign placement and maintenance.

These Recurring Review Reports are established to determine if the implemented response action continues to minimize explosives safety risks and continues to be protective of human health, safety and the environment. In 1997-98, an ordnance removal action was conducted along trails and campsites in the Dolly Sods Wilderness, Dolly Sods North, and Dolly Sods Scenic Areas of the former West Virginia Maneuver Area. The Recurring Review Reports are prepared in accordance with USACE Engineering Regulation (ER) 200-3-1 and Engineering Pamphlet (EP) 75-1-4 which provide specific procedures for developing and implementing five-year review requirements. The completion date for this second five-year recurring review is scheduled for September 2009.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District, has entered a research agreement with West Virginia University (WVU) and the Monongahela National Forest to conduct environmental forensics sampling to identify possible unexploded ordnance (UXO) locations at the former West Virginia Maneuver Area. The scope of the research is to develop environmental forensic capabilities at WVU to identify concentrations of contaminants from UXO in the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area. The sampling will use surface and ground water, soil, and biological sampling to identify UXO contaminates and decomposition products. The results of the sampling will be combined with GIS and transport models to delineate possible concentrations of ordnance within the wilderness area.

The first round of sampling was conducted on 25-29 June 2007 in the Dolly Sods North and Wilderness Areas. During this round of sampling WVU faculty and students, a USACE UXO Safety Specialist from Huntsville, AL UXO Center of Expertise, and two USACE Huntington District employees participated. The UXO safety specialist was present to ensure team safety by ensuring the sampling locations were clear of any possible UXO prior to sampling. Areas of UXO finds from the 1997-98 trail clearance were used in order to determine sampling locations with known UXO locations that had previously been determined. Results from this sampling event will likely be available in August following analytical analysis of the sampled media. The completed sampling results and GIS input will produce insight into weather the sampled media contains munitions constituents and soil characteristics of the Dolly Sods area. This information could prove extremely beneficial in locating UXO in Dolly Sods in the future

 

WVMA Team Gives Presentation at Mountain State Forest Festival

This year the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) presented a booth at the Mountain State Forest Festival held in Elkins, WV from October 5-7, 2006. This booth allowed the FUDS Team Members the opportunity to speak with local citizens about the past usage of the West Virginia Maneuver Area and extending the message of following safety procedures while visiting the Dolly Sods Wilderness Area. Promotional items prominently featuring the Dolly Sods safety message were passed out to festival attendees. These promotional items included water bottles, highlighters, pens, and key chains. Each promotional item featured the Monongahela National Forest's UXO Hotline Phone Number. Overall the presentation was deemed a success since the Dolly Sods safety message was presented to a large group of people.

2nd Annual DoD Sustainable Ranges Initiative

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and S&C Advertising & Public Relations (S&C) co-presented and showcased the West Virginia Maneuver Area and the Dolly Sods community awareness and education work at the Department of Defense (DoD) Sustainable Ranges Initiative Conference & Exhibition. The conference took place at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas from August 22-25, 2005.

USACE and S&C featured many of the important public awareness and education tools developed for this campaign such as: “Wally the Woodchuck”, the Dolly Sods area map, brochures, video, and tradeshow booth, to name a few.

As a result of S&C and USACE’s innovative outreach efforts, public safety information is readily available to all those seeking the enjoyment that Dolly Sods has to offer.

About the Conference

Military operational ranges and training areas are used to test and evaluate weapons systems and to train Department of Defense (DoD) personnel. Increasingly, the military's goal to "train as we fight" is being challenged by various issues that directly impact range sustainability. In 2001, the Sustainable Ranges Initiative was established as DoD's approach to combating encroachment and ensuring the long-term viability of its training and testing ranges and installations throughout the world.

The Sustainable Ranges Initiative Conference & Exhibition provided a venue for the exchange of information and ideas that will benefit all stake holders involved in the military range domain.

Experts in all areas of range management and sustainability participated in the conference. The exhibition featured more than 100 organizations representing government and industry.

 

New Trails Map Mass Production & Distribution

One of the most important tools developed during the public awareness and education campaign was the Dolly Sods area map, which includes campsites, trails and other important landmarks. It is important to note that before the development of this map there was no current detailed map of the area available to the public. A map of the cleared campsites and trails is of great importance to visitors of the area. It will ensure that visitors know which areas have been cleared of unexploded ordnance (UXO) left behind from WWII military maneuvers and improve safety at Dolly Sods.

Thousands of maps began to be distributed to the public by USACE, the U.S. Forest Service and other state agencies in spring 2005. The USACE has identified key areas of distribution for the map, which include, but are not limited to: visitor centers, chambers of commerce, hotels, first responders, media outlets, tourism organizations and other state agencies. The Forest Service will distribute at their local offices and at the Dolly Sods area.

As with anything printed, the thousands of maps will at some point become depleted and cease to be available. Internet access to a downloadable and printable map can continue to ensure the safety of visitors to the Dolly Sods area. To increase distribution of the Dolly Sods map, it has been included in the USACE Web site at various resolutions to allow for easy downloading.

200602299_JD_Basis-.pdf

JD_FORM_200601394-.pdf

 

Web Development Efforts

Key to educating the general public and providing the most outreach materials available within the reach of key stakeholders of the Dolly Sods Project, is the development of a Web site that contains all the educational tools developed to educate the public about how to enjoy Dolly Sods safely while learning about the dangers of UXO . Making these materials available on the Internet will increase the campaign’s reach far beyond the West Virginia state borders. All stakeholders will be encouraged to use the Web site to download the information to teach their audiences about the wonders of Dolly Sods as well as the safety information.

The purpose of the West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA) Web site is to inform the public of USACE project activities, provide the public with outreach materials and information, and to facilitate information exchange between team members. It contains all of the other important project documents and information for a comprehensive understanding of the project.

Several important educational tools intended for all ages were developed for this campaign and are available to view and download on the WVMA Web site. A new Dolly Sods area map was created by USACE in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service that includes current terrain, safe trails and camping grounds. Adult and children’s brochures were designed to convey the UXO safety message easily and effectively. The children’s brochure includes several educational exercises featuring the character “Wally the Woodchuck” to reinforce the safety message, whereas the adult version conveys the message in a straight forward manner.

The Dolly Sods educational video was another important tool created. The video provides site history, describes the important role Dolly Sods played in WWII, and features USACE team members providing an explanation of the clean-up efforts. The video is an extremely important and effective tool for educators, first responders and visitor centers, to name a few.

Several presentations were developed to aid in educating different segments of the stakeholders on UXO safety. The children’s Flash presentation features “Wally the Woodchuck” explaining the “3 Important Rules of UXO Safety” which are “Spot, Walk Away and Call” in a fun and exciting way. These rules are intended to be simple allowing even children to remember them easily. The adult PowerPoint presentation employs the same simple message and also features beautiful photos of the Dolly Sods area, real pictures of UXO, and an explanation of FUDS and USACE activities. A “Train the Trainer” PowerPoint presentation was developed specifically to educate teachers, firefighters, law enforcement and other community leaders on UXO safety at Dolly Sods. The presentation explains useful methods to present the difficult subject matter to the general public in a fun and interesting way. The presentation also outlines steps of good presentation preparation and execution to help the trainer be as informative as possible.

 

WVMA Project Wins Coveted 2005 Telly Award

For developing an innovative animated flash video which educates the public about potential hazards associated with unexploded ordnance in the former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA), S&C Advertising & Public Relations (San Antonio, Texas) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District, were honored in the Safety category of the 26th Annual Telly Awards competition. Founded in 1978, the Telly Awards honor outstanding local, regional and cable TV commercials and programs, as well as the finest video and film productions. The Telly Awards annually showcase the best work of the most respected advertising agencies, production companies, television stations, cable operators, and corporate video departments in the world. The Telly Awards is a widely known and highly respected national and international competition and receives over 10,000 entries annually from all 50 states and many foreign countries.

Review of WVMA Ordnance Removal Action Completed

Dolly Sods is located between Canaan Valley and Seneca Rocks within the Monongahela National Forest of West Virginia. High upon the Allegheny Plateau, with elevations ranging from 2,600 to 4,100 feet, the region of more than 18,500 acres is well known for its extensive rocky plains, upland bogs and sweeping vistas. The remoteness, natural experience, and limited human influences attract adventurous hikers, mountain bikers, anglers, hunters and berry pickers to the region. During 1943 and 1944, military maneuver exercises and artillery/mortar practice were conducted in the Dolly Sods region by the U.S. Department of the Army (USDoA), as training for involvement in World War II.

The Dolly Sods region was a part of the former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA). It is documented based upon found unexploded ordnance (UXO), that rounds fired during the military training included 40 mm, 57 mm armor-piercing (AP), and 105 mm and 155 mm high explosive (HE) projectiles, and 60 mm HE, 81 mm HE and smoke round (SR), and 4.2 inch inert, HE, and SR mortars. Reports document that 75 mm artillery and experimental (containing no explosive components) rocket mortar fire also occurred in the region, although no physical evidence (i.e. found UXO) of such activity exists.

Following military maneuvers in the Dolly Sods region, the USDoA conducted ordnance clearances during 1946 and 1953. The exact amount of ordnance which remains in the region is undetermined. However, ordnance related risk is illustrated by one injury caused by UXO detonation during 1951, and a sporadic but continuous discovery of UXO by recreational visitors since the clearances. To address ordnance-related concerns, an ordnance removal action, focused on significant reduction of public risk, was conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) during 1997 and 1998. The USACE Huntington District has project management responsibilities, and project technical support is provided by the Army Engineering Support Center. During the 1997 to 1998 removal action, all designated trails and inventoried campsites were cleared, and the removal/ disposal of 22 live mortars, 19 inert mortars, and 1151.5 pounds of OE-related scrap significantly reduced the quantity of items posing a hazard to the public in the most widely used areas of the region. The removal action was the most feasible alternative based on the influencing factors of cost, environmental impact, and reduction of public risk.

During 2003 and 2004, USACE conducted an ordnance and explosives (OE) recurring review of the Dolly Sods project. The purpose of the review was to ensure that the implemented 1997 to 1998 ordnance removal action continues to minimize explosives safety risks and continues to be protective of human health, safety, and the environment. The review process consisted of the following activities: the notification and involvement of stakeholders, the review of existing and relevant documentation and data, the identification and review of recent and new information, a community survey and public interviews, and an assessment of site conditions. The study process, and its conclusions and recommendations are documented in the recurring review report, which is available in the project public repository (located at the Monongahela National Forest Headquarters in Elkins, WV) or by contacting the USACE Huntington District (1-800-822- 8413).

The 2003 to 2004 review concluded that the 1997 to 1998 ordnance removal action completed in the Dolly Sods region is functioning as intended; it is still protective of human health, safety, and the environment. No UXO or OE-related scrap were identified during the site assessment, nor were any OE concerns due to erosion, storm damage, changes in landuse or recreational use found. Vegetation provides soil stability across most of the region, and site conditions and usage have not changed noticeably since the removal action. Further, mountainous and rugged terrain along with dense vegetation makes human access to many portions of the region that were not cleared for ordnance difficult.

Prior to the 1997 to 1998 removal action in the Dolly Sods region, there were many instances (e.g. an average of ten per year during one ten year period) in which UXO was encountered along designated trails and at inventoried campsites. Since 1998, there have been only seven cases of encountered UXO by recreational visitors. In each case, UXO was found in an area that receives little visitor traffic, nobody was injured, and the U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal conducted disposal after being contacted through established notification and reporting processes. No UXO has been found since 1998 in the highly used areas of Dolly Sods (i.e. along the trails or at the campsites that were cleared for ordnance), and this indicates that the removal action is functioning as intended. Recent incidents have occurred because visitors have wandered away from cleared trails, and because a complete detection and removal of ordnance in the region could not be accomplished due to the environmental damage that would occur, the extremely high estimated cost, and technology limitations. The previous removal action was not expected to negate ordnance-related risk entirely; therefore, continued periodic reviews of the site and the education of individuals who use the region are necessary.

Institutional controls are currently in place for the Dolly Sods project; however, USACE determined through the review that certain controls can be improved, and additional controls can be implemented to increase public awareness and ensure continued safety. Based on the site assessment, signs warning visitors of the potential to encounter ordnance do exist in the region, but they can be placed at additional locations. While certain trail sections are well marked and maintained, many designated trail sections can be marked better, making it easier to remain only in areas that have been cleared for ordnance when hiking. Based on the recurring review findings, USACE is currently implementing several additional programs to ensure that the community is well aware of existing ordnance-related risk in the Dolly Sods region.

 

Trail Maps Developed for the Dolly Sods Region

Rocky plains, upland bogs and sweeping vistas attract tens of thousands of recreational visitors to the Dolly Sods Region (DSR) of West Virginia annually. The DSR is comprised of three distinct areas: Dolly Sods Wilderness (DSW), Dolly Sods North (DSN), and Dolly Sods Scenic Area (DSSA). The 10,215 acre DSW was created by an act of Congress in 1975 to preserve and protect the area with special opportunities for solitude, recreation and other scientific, educational, scenic and historical values. During 1992 and 1993, 6,168.5 acres located north of the DSW were purchased by the U.S. Forest Service; this area is known as DSN. To the immediate east of DSW and DSN, 2,268 acres along Forest Road 75 have the designation of National Scenic Area; this area is known as DSSA.

Because an accurate DSR trails map is not currently publicly available, and for the purpose of facilitating public use of trails that have been cleared of ordnance, the USACE, with assistance from the U.S. Forest Service, has developed a new trails map for the DSR. The detailed map provides information on topography, trail locations and distances, landmarks, regional boundaries, roads, and UTM NAD83 coordinate values. Nineteen trails which have been cleared for ordnance, and which total 47.9 miles in length, were plotted on the map using differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) data. Plans are currently underway to begin distributing color copies of the map (free of charge) as part of an educational brochure in the DSR during 2004.

For additional information about the map contact the USACE Huntington District at 1-800-822-8413.

 

Wally the Woodchuck Aiding the WVMA Public Awareness and Education

The Dolly Sods Region of the former West Virginia Maneuver Area (WVMA) is widely renowned as an outdoor paradise. Up to 76,000 anglers, hikers, hunters, mountain bikers, and other outdoor enthusiasts come to this pristine mountainous area annually to enjoy its solitude, natural beauty, and recreational opportunities. Due to the military exercises conducted in the area by the Army during World War II, there is the potential that visitors could come in contact with unexploded ordnance (UXO) in certain areas of the region which have not been cleared for ordnance. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and other state and federal agencies are committed to informing the public of the events that took place in the Dolly Sods region, and the inherent possible hazards in the region. Careful attention is being taken to ensure that the public is aware of the presence of UXO, but at the same time is not scared to the point that they will not use the land for its intended purposes.

Over the past year USACE’s Huntington District has been conducting an Ordnance and Explosives (OE) Recurring Review study to determine the effectiveness of an implemented ordnance removal project that occurred during 1997-98. The purpose of the 1997-98 removal project was to minimize explosives risks and provide increased protection to human health and the environment. The removal project included clearing 55.79 miles of trails (the trail itself and 20’off center line to each side of the trail) and 178 campsites in the area of UXO. A new public awareness and education campaign had been developed through recent efforts by the project team. This campaign will implement new strategies to inform the public about past activities and possible regional hazards. Some of the new public awareness programs that have been recently initiated include the following:

  • Passing out water bottles, key chains, and other merchandise which have key contact and UXO response information on them, to hikers and other visitors in the area.
  • Posting UXO warning signs in locations with high visitor traffic, containing a warning, photograph of UXO found in the area, and a phone number to call if UXO is encountered.
    o Brochures that contain a map of Dolly Sods Region trails that were cleared of UXO have been created and will soon be made available in local National Forest Service offices, local businesses, Huntington District website, etc.
  • Project and UXO notification information has been listed on the Huntington District website. Included in this information are the WVMA Administrative Record, historical information, brochures, maps, and safety procedures.
  • The Huntington District publishes an annual newsletter to interested parties to keep them up to date on the latest news and actions taking place in their community.
  • Animations and videos, with Wally the Woodchuck, the newly developed project mascot, have been produced and will soon be distributed to teachers to help educate local school children regarding UXO safety and notification.

Public meetings have been and will continue to be held to keep the public informed of project phases and progress. All of the programs are being implemented so citizens will have a better understanding of possible UXO hazards at Dolly Sods. It is the mission of the Dolly Sods Team that every person using this area has the knowledge to recognize, mark, and report a UXO if it is encountered.

Brightly colored signs like the one shown to the left have been placed at 13 Dolly Sods locations that receive high amounts of visitor traffic, including trailheads, informational displays, and the Red Creek campground, for reporting any ordnance-related incidents.
For additional information on ordnance reporting and project- related activities, contact the USACE Huntington District at 1-800-822-8413.

 

WVMA Project Showcased at USEPA Conference

During 2004 the WVMA team was selected to give a presentation at a national USEPA conference, in order to share advances that the team has made in the area of UXO-related community awareness and education. The presentation demonstrated the importance of effective agency partnering in such projects, provided examples of DSR outreach tools, and promoted an exchange of ideas regarding ways to educate the public about UXO-related risk. The presentation titled “Strategies for Public Awareness and Education Concerning Unexploded Ordnance Risk in the Former WVMA” was presented at the USEPA Community Involvement Conference in Denver, Colorado. The conference was attended by over 500 people representing federal, state, local, and tribal partners, and proved to be an excellent opportunity to share lessons learned regarding public participation, community involvement, partnership building, and outreach and education related to all aspects of environmental protection.