US Army Corps of Engineers
Huntington District

 

Regulatory Determining Wetlands

LRH
Published Aug. 25, 2017
Katie Taylor from the District Office and Jeremy Kinney of the Dover Field Office of the Regulatory Division preforming a wetland delineation verification in northeastern Ohio.

Katie Taylor from the District Office and Jeremy Kinney of the Dover Field Office of the Regulatory Division preforming a wetland delineation verification in northeastern Ohio.

Katie Taylor from the District Office and Jeremy Kinney of the Dover Field Office of the Regulatory Division preforming a wetland delineation verification in northeastern Ohio.  Wetlands are areas that are covered by water or have waterlogged soils for long periods during the growing season. Plants growing in wetlands are capable of living in saturated soil conditions for at least part of the growing season. Wetlands such as swamps and marshes are often obvious, but some wetlands are not easily recognized, often because they are dry during part of the year or "they just don't look very wet" from the roadside. Some of these wetland types include, but are not limited to, many bottomland forests, pocosins, pine savannahs, bogs, wet meadows, potholes, and wet tundra. The information presented here usually will enable you to determine whether you might have a wetland. If you intend to place dredged or fill material in a wetland or in an area that might be a wetland, contact the District Office or a local Field Office for assistance in determining if a permit is required.