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Water Street Section 14 Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Published Oct. 30, 2020
Water Street Section 14 Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Recently the Huntington District hosted a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony celebrating the completion of the Continuing Authorities Program, Section 14 Streambank Stabilization Project at Water Street in Barboursville, West Virginia.

Recently the Huntington District hosted a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony celebrating the completion of the Continuing Authorities Program, Section 14 Streambank Stabilization Project at Water Street in Barboursville, West Virginia.

Colonel Evers was joined by Congresswoman Carol Miller, Barboursville Mayor Chris Tatum and representatives from Senators Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito to cut the ribbon marking the completion of the project.

The project consisted of a series of river bank stabilization measures for over 800 feet of the streambank  of the Guyandotte River.  Measures were implemented to substantially reduce erosion during high water events and to ensure the protection of critical infrastructure supporting the village, specifically the utilities and truck route intersection supporting the McClung Street intersection. 

This project required extensive teamwork between the Non-Federal Sponsor and District personnel in completing a challenging project for the contractor. They had to create stability in an area experiencing continuous failure throughout construction.  The completion of the project is a tribute to the hard work and professionalism of multiple parties including the community and the West Virginia Department of Highways. It was completed in under a year and demonstrates how USACE is Revolutionizing project delivery.

Barboursville was incorporated in 1813 and included a portion of the road now known as US Route 60, Guyandotte River locks and dams, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and maintenance facilities. Upon completion of Guyandotte and Ohio River clearing and snagging, boat and barge construction facilities were operational during the mid-1800’s. The most significant navigation uses of the Guyandotte River included barge transport of coal and rafting of logs to and downriver from the Ohio Confluence to the Mississippi River. During the period of record from 1813 to 1967, extensive bank erosion and failure occurred along portions of McClung and Water Street. Prior efforts to stabilize this road system included construction of stone buttresses, drains, and blankets together with the installation of H-pile and lagging structures. This construction project included excavation of failed soils and the construction of a stone buttress together with toe and trench drains.